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FinTwit Roundup: 11 August 2020

Early Monday morning, the Russian Federation (more specifically, Vladimir Putin, President of Russia) announced that a new COVID-19 vaccine is not only effective, but that Putin's own daughter has already been vaccinated with it. In one of the greatest multi-generational mic-drops of all time, Russia decided to name the vaccine Sputnik V. Unsurprisingly, the news was met with great skepticism - partly because vaccine headlines have become a daily occurrence, and partly because a Russian nanobot vaccine wouldn't be the weirdest conspiracy theory that turned out to be true.

Gold, silver, and other precious metals crashed today to levels not seen since ten days ago. The markets are in pure shock. 

 As one Twitter user points out, this is the largest negative one-day percent drop that Silver has seen since the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers. 

The -15% drop was surprising, but not as much given the macro environment. Markets have been quite lackluster for a few days now, leading some to devise their own conjecture:

That's it for today! Thank you for reading and don't forget to follow me on Twitter if you aren't already.


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